Chokecherry, Prunus virginiana: A key species for pollinators

blossoms of chokecherry, Ruckle Provincial Park, Salt Spring Island – 2019 April 23 chokecherry Ruckle P4230169

Chokecherry, Prunus virginiana, is the most ubiquitous tree in the northern half of North America. As the most numerous, wild fruit tree on the continent, chokecherry is a pillar of many ecosystems especially as a food source for pollinators. Around the Salish Sea, chokecherry occurs from the edges of beaches and Garry oak meadows to sunnier openings in old-growth Douglas fir and Western hemlock forests. At a time of greater stress from rising temperatures, less predictable weather, more damaging storms, and increasing, trans-Pacific air pollution, these two, old trees, in Ruckle Provincial Park on Salt Spring Island, provide excellent sites for monitoring pollinators.

blooming chokecherry, Ruckle Provincial Park – 2019 April 23 chokecherry Ruckle P4230164

 

blossom of chokecherry, Ruckle Provincial Park, Salt Spring Island – 2019 April 23 chokecherry Ruckle P4230175

 

blooming chokecherry, Ruckle Provincial Park, Salt Spring Island – 2019 April 23 chokecherry Ruckle P4230177